• Brian Hirschy Photography - PRINTS GIVE AWAY (1 of 1)-2

Tibet Photo Print Giveaway

A totally no-strings-attached way to give back... if you want it.

A few of posts back (Lights & Shadows, Colors & Shapes) some folks mentioned that they’d enjoy seeing some of the images in print.  I happened to agree.

I love printing.  Any photographer will tell you that seeing their work in print is always special.  Bringing an image from the abstract (often digital) into the concrete world is a great experience and one that I do on almost a weekly basis in China.

Luckily enough, a while back I had the opportunity to meet up with a few friends who started a fantastic creative and print agency (Moxy Ox).  I was eager to run a few prints through their press especially since they have an awesome set up and wanted to try some ‘experimental’ processes on these images.  We ended up printing on a super -thick paper stock using an ‘Ice Pearl’ paper and a semi-translucent ink which creates a really special effect on the highlights (looks like crystals in the ink, see below images).

They turned out fantastic.  I want to give them away. 

I’m giving out five 12×18 prints as pictured below*.  If you are interested, please do one of the following:

  • Post a comment below saying you’d want one.
  • Write a tweet saying you’d want one and copy my twitter name (@bhirschyphoto)
  • Write a comment on my Facebook page saying you’d want one (here)
  • Write me an email saying you’d want one (here)

I want to be clear as possible, this is a give away which means I expect absolutely nothing in return from you**.  This is not a promotional thing by any means nor am I ostentatious enough to think people really want my work.  This is simply me trying to give something back to people.  You don’t have to follow me, like me, promote me, beg your friends to tweet about me – any of that nonsense.  A free giveaway should be free and that’s what I aim for this to be.  You could hate me and what I do and I’d still add your name as one of the folks who could possibly receive this.  I’m a photographer.  I make pictures.  I want you to have the opportunity to have one if you want without having to jump through hoops.

 

 A FEW NOTES:

I’ll be giving away FIVE(5) prints at the end of two weeks.  I will put everyones name in a list and select 5 people at random.  Only five people will receive prints.  I wish it were more.  ** The reason I ask people to tweet, comment, Facebook, or email me is so I know who you are and that you want one – no other reason, I promise.  If you are worried that this is a promotional thing or that I’m a liar, please email me if you want one – simple.  No one has to know!  *** I paid to have these printed, these were not provided to me for free.  I’ll also pay to have them shipped to you if you are are lucky enough to be selected.  FREE IS FREE.


Watching my prints run through the process at Moxy Ox was amazing. I always wanted to know a bit more about what goes on behind the scenes of high-end printing and it was fascinating to spend an afternoon with them.  These guys know their stuff and did such an amazing job with these prints – I’d be a total jerk if I didn’t give them a shout out.  Things prints do look amazing.  Take a quick look at some of the images from my time there.  It’s like a magical wonderland for creatives…

 

 

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  • Brian Hirschy Photography - China 2012 (1 of 1)
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Humanizing China

Adding a face to America's message on China...

 

Last week my wife and I sat down to watch the Obama/Romney debate.  I usually avoid watch these debates because I turn into a cynic (and learn very little).  Long story short, I watched it – was pretty much what I expected.  One thing that I didn’t see coming was some of the harsh language against China.

I guess being out of America for so long had left me separated from parts of the politically-changing landscape and public opinion of China as whole.  Now I very much understand the international politics that are involved in a Presidential election(human rights, international trade, pollution, government philosophical differences, etc)  and how these things do need to be addressed in America’s diplomacy with China.  These are all very serious and important issues – issues that justify the term ‘Getting tough on China.”

However, I fear us as humans accidentally dehumanizing the average Chinese person.  It’s no question that I love China, and for the most part, I sincerely love the Chinese – a fact that probably disqualifies me from speaking on such a subject in many peoples minds.  But we should remember this: horrible things happen when we dehumanize other people.

I’ll leave my thoughts there, but state that the innately humanizing ability of photography is one of the things I love about it.  Photography has the ability to remind us of our similarities versus our differences and put a literal face on situations like these.

 

“When I dehumanize you, I indirectly dehumanize myself.” – Nelson Mandela

 

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3 of 3: People

Part 3 of 3: Images from HuZhu, QingHai country side. In the mountains with culturally confusing monks.

I’m continuing with a three part series on a trip I recently took to the QingHai country side of western China.  You can check out parts 1 and 2 here:  Light & Shadows & Colors & Shapes.  For some backstory, see below:

Last month I visited GonLung Jampaling Monastery in HuZhu county, QingHai, western China.  HuZhu is one of the hidden treasures of western China because of it’s vast and varied minority mix – Mongolia, Tibetan, Muslim, Han.  Just to give you an idea of how confusing things can get in HuZhu, the location we visited was a Tibetan Buddhist monastery composed almost entirely of ethnic Mongolians who spoke Chinese.  Tibetan Mongolian Chinese speakers whose cousins are probably Muslims.  Yeah, exactly.

 

One thing I’d say to anyone interested in culturally-based photographic fields (travel, humanitarian, storytelling, NGO) is this – Don’t miss the people.  Please don’t miss the people.  I truly believe if we miss the people we’ve missed out on 99% of the reward that comes from travelling.  As a story teller a human experience is almost always the crux of a story.  That interaction, respect, and experience is necessary to understanding the story.

Miss the people, miss the stories.  

But it’s so much more than telling compelling stories.  The people we meet and interact with while travelling will be what we remember most when looking back on our time in a new place or culture – that has overwhelmingly been my experience.  Folks that we get to take out for workshops and tours almost always come away deeply touched by a human interaction, remembering it much more than any photo instruction we could have given them.  The human interactions, the stories, and the cultural exchanges I’ve had over the years have made a huge impact on my life, all for the positive, and it’s something that I hope people who travel can experience as well.

Make it a point to engage people when you travel.  It can be hard, but there are great resources available for those who are interested.  I can’t recommend enough that you take a look at the following list of people and organizations.  They are by far and away the best in the industry at valuing people and their stories.  Beyond that, they are all fantastic photographers – which is not surprising.

 

 

Other Photographers…all smarter than me, better than me, & worth listening to:

 

This is not the post I really meant to write today, but I feel it’s an important message and one that I’m obviously passionate about. Forgive me for my ‘preachiness.’  I’m just a really big fan of the peoples and cultures – understanding and respecting them.

I hope you guys enjoy the images!

 

Like all lists, there is no way to make a comprehensive one. Initially the list above was just a hand full of photographers I’ve worked with or knew personally – knew their hearts and their heads and their work.  If’ I’m going to recommend people to you, I’d like to do it faithfully.  If you know of someone that deserves to be on this list, by all means, add them in the comments below and tell us all why and how they are great at focusing on people.  We need more photographers who value people and cultures.  A person or group not being on this list is by no means intended to be a conscious or deliberate dismissal of their work or character. As always, add to the conversation below!

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2 of 3: Colors & Shapes

Part 2 of 3: Images from HuZhu, QingHai country side. In the mountains with culturally confusing monks.

I continue to have a great time catching up on the last few months of much-needed editing.  Lot’s done.  Lot’s more to go.  I posted the first part of my series here, called Light & Shadows. Part two is appropriately called ‘Colors & Shapes.’  Just to give you a heads up, here is what’s going on with this series:

Last month I visited GonLung Jampaling Monastery in HuZhu county, QingHai, western China.  HuZhu is one of the hidden treasures of western China because of it’s vast and varied minority mix – Mongolia, Tibetan, Muslim, Han.  Just to give you an idea of how confusing things can get in HuZhu, the location we visited was a Tibetan Buddhist monastery composed almost entirely of ethnic Mongolians who spoke Chinese.  Tibetan Mongolian Chinese speakers whose cousins are probably Muslims.  Yeah, exactly.

Part two is meant to stand in strong contrast to Light & Shadows.  One of the interesting things that always stands out to me when visiting these monasteries is how and where the light falls  - through open doors into unlit rooms, underneath the draped prayer flag canopies, and down high alleyways.  Natures light modifiers!  The day that we visited was totally overcast causing just about everything with even a hint of color to vibrantly pop out against the gray background.  I wish you guys could have been there with me, it was so much fun!  Next time, right?

As always, I sincerely hope you guys enjoy the images.

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1 of 3: Light & Shadows

Part 1 of 3: Images from HuZhu, QingHai country side. In the mountains with culturally confusing monks.

Two months worth of back editing continues. Last month I visited GonLung Jampaling Monastery in HuZhu county, QingHai, western China.  HuZhu is one of the hidden treasures of western China because of it’s vast and varied minority mix – Mongolia, Tibetan, Muslim, Han.  Just to give you an idea of how confusing things can get in HuZhu, the location we visited was a Tibetan Buddhist monastery composed almost entirely of ethnic Mongolians who spoke Chinese.  Tibetan Mongolian Chinese speakers whose cousins are probably Muslims.  Yeah, exactly.

Nonetheless, my good friend Jamin and I spent the entire afternoon in the foothills exploring monasteries and temples while visiting and chatting with the local monks.  HuZhu is amazing and strongly reminds me of Rocky Mountain National Park – but higher, more rural, more Tibetan, and colder.  It’s a great place to visit.

I’ve broken up my images into three different sections that I will post on in the coming days.  I tried to squeeze them all into one post, but things just got horribly long winded and confusing.  Be sure to click on the “VIEW SLIDESHOW” button to see all of the images – only a few are posted.  

I sincerely hope you guys enjoy the images.

 

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